414 Churchill Avenue N, Ottawa ON, K1Z 5C6

613-853-2822

Ottawa's Maturing Neighbourhoods

CRITERIA FOR HEALTHY GROWTH AND CHANGE

Ecological Responsibility

Our neighbourhoods must become more environmentally sustainable.  We are all quite aware of the impact of improved home construction to reduce energy consumption.  But the energy savings of living a walkable urban lifestyle exceeds the saving of "green sprawl".   And a building footprint is closely related to it's environmental footprint.

In simple terms, we can understand development patterns/choices in 'earths' -- How many planet earths would we need if everyone lived the way I do?  Here are some examples from our Ottawa experience:

1950 Single Family Home

8 people per household
125 sq.ft./person

Average home <1,000 sq.ft.

7.2 people/ registered
personal vehicle
2,280 km / vehicle / yr
2,540 km / household / yr

1.9 EARTHS

2019 Renovated Single

2.5 people per household
840 sq.ft./person

Avg. home - 2,100 sq.ft. 

1.5 people/ registered
personal vehicle
16,000 km / vehicle / yr
26,700 km / household / yr

4.8 EARTHS

2019 Add Env. Features

2.5 people per household
840 sq.ft./person

Avg. home - 2,100 sq.ft. 

1.5 people/ registered
personal vehicle
16,000 km / vehicle / yr
26,700 km / household / yr

3.9 EARTHS

2019 Semi Detached

2.5 people per household
840 sq.ft./person

Avg. home - 2,100 sq.ft. 

1.5 people/ registered
personal vehicle
16,000 km / vehicle / yr
26,700 km / household / yr

3.5 EARTHS

These statistics are surprising in a whole variety of ways.  Notice that in 1950 there were many more people in one house. This included extended family and boarders.  Small households were much less common than they are today.  See Stat's Canada chart below.

Our expectations for housing have ballooned, but our younger generations are now demonstrating a preference for smaller living, and certainly are limited by income and high housing prices.  Options for affordable ground oriented housing are limited, and many young families have no option but to settle in suburbia, where house prices are lower... but the cost to our environment is much higher.

More and more low density housing produces more roads, more paving, less farmland, less wetland, car dependent lifestyles, longer commute times and much more use of fossil fuel.

We must intensify our Cities.  How?  Some suggest the solution lies in Vancouver-ism... built UP.  Build Nodes of high density.  But tall buildings are, for many of us, prohibitively expensive.  And though living in towers suits some, many feel that 'high living' isolates from the natural environment we are working to protect.  We need to stay connected... close to ground-to-treetop ecology... where we are nurtured in our experience of the ecosystems we share.  

Compare the options for neighbourhood renewal.  (Each year about 1 in every 100 homes in Westboro is replaced with some form of infill).  The following options can all be built without significant impact on neighbourhood character, and within similar zoning envelopes.

Renovated Single

2.5 people per household
840 sq.ft./person

Avg. home - 2,100 sq.ft. 

1.5 people/ registered
personal vehicle
16,000 km / vehicle / yr
26,700 km / household / yr

4.8 EARTHS

Add Env. Features

2.5 people per household
840 sq.ft./person

Avg. home - 2,100 sq.ft. 

1.5 people/ registered
personal vehicle
16,000 km / vehicle / yr
26,700 km / household / yr

3.9 EARTHS

Semi Detached

2.5 people per household
840 sq.ft./person

Avg. home - 2,100 sq.ft. 

1.5 people/ registered
personal vehicle
16,000 km / vehicle / yr
26,700 km / household / yr

3.5 EARTHS

Multi Unit Home

2.4 people per household
334 sq.ft./ person

Average home - 800 sq.ft.

7.2 people / registered
personal vehicle
+/- 2,300 km / vehicle / yr
*walkable lifestyle

0.9 EARTHS

Criteria for Growth:

  1. Walkable

  2. Socially engaging

  3. Diverse (both in income and household demographics)

  4. Ecologically responsible

  5. Affordable (individually & collectively)​

“I don't want to protect the environment I want to create a world in which the environment doesn't need protecting.”

Unknown

“We are living on this planet as if we had another one to go to”

Terri Swearingen

"These neighbourhoods [with single family homes] accomplish several historic feats: They take up more space per person, and they are more expensive to build and operate than any urban form ever constructed. They require more roads for every resident, and more water pipes, more sewers – more power cables, utility wiring, sidewalks, signposts, and landscaping. They cost more for municipalities to maintain. They cost more to protect with emergency services. They pollute more and pour more carbon into the atmosphere. In short, the dispersed city is the most expensive, resource-intense, land gobbling, polluting way of living ever built."

Charles Montgomery, Happy City.

"...the location of the home is far more important than are the green features of the house itself. This is because urban location and local context (such as the presence of nearby shops and services, schools and employment opportunities, and the presence of walkable, connected streets) determine how much travel occurs and by what mode.”

Pamela Blais, Perverse Cities

"First, that urbanism – compact and walkable development – will arise naturally if the built-in bias of our current infrastructure investments, financial structures, zoning norms, and public policies is reformed. Second, that such urbanism, when mixed with simple conservation technologies, can have a major impact in reducing carbon emissions and energy demand. Third, that urbanism is the most cost-effective solution to climate change, more so than most renewable technologies. And finally, that urbanism's many collateral benefits – economic, social, and environmental – enhance its desirability and economics. In short, urbanism is the foundation for a low carbon future and is our least-cost option."

Peter Calthrope, Urbanism in the Age of Climate Change.

“Density means genuinely walkable neighbourhoods that can be effectively served by mass transit and rely less on the car. More to the point, denser living, in smaller homes and with shorter commutes, produces a low-carbon city.”

House Divided; How the Missing Middle Will Solve Toronto's Affordability Crisis

Assume for argument that weatherization and greening this home [average single-family home in the U.S.] can reduce building energy consumption by 30% and that the family buys new cars with 50% better mileage.  The result is a 32% overall energy reduction -- not bad for "green sprawl".  In contrast, a typical townhome located in a walkable neighbourhood (not necessarily downtown but near transit) without any solar panels for hybrid cars consumes 38% less energy than such a suburban single-family home.  Traditional Urbanism, even without greet technology, is better than green sprawl.  

Peter Calthrope, Urbanism in the Age of Climate Change.

Calculations are based on the information gathered from the websites listed below. The numbers in our work are based on national averages.

bbc.com

ourwoldindata.org

CALCULATE YOUR OWN FOOTPRINT:

https://www.footprintcalculator.org/

http://ecologicalfootprint.com/

There are a number of features that make the Multi Unit Home so much more sustainable; shared walls/floors/roofs reduce energy use, shared land and smaller dwelling units allow population growth without any sprawl, and high density allows existing neighbourhoods to become walkable thus reducing the use of fossil fuel.

Now consider what happens to the remaining homes in this neighbourhood, who benefit from the walkable lifestyles that are possible as a result of the cumulative effect of Multi Unit Home infill projects.

Renovated Single

2.5 people per household
840 sq.ft./person

Avg. home - 2,100 sq.ft. 

1.5 people/ registered
personal vehicle
+/- 2,540 km / vehicle / yr

*walkable lifestyle

2.6 EARTHS

Single with Env. Features

2.5 people per household
840 sq.ft./person

Avg. home - 2,100 sq.ft. 

1.5 people/ registered
personal vehicle
+/- 2,540 km / vehicle / yr

*walkable lifestyle

1.7 EARTHS

Semi Detached

2.5 people per household
840 sq.ft./person

Avg. home - 2,100 sq.ft. 

1.5 people/ registered
personal vehicle
+/- 2,540 km / vehicle / yr

*walkable lifestyle

1.3 EARTHS

Multi Unit Home

2.4 people per household
334 sq.ft./ person

Average home - 800 sq.ft.

7.2 people / registered
personal vehicle
+/- 2,540 km / vehicle / yr
*walkable lifestyle

0.9 EARTHS